Ron and Daisy's Wedding
Daisy Wright.

Daisy Wright.

Ron Liversuch.

Ron Liversuch.

Ron and Daisy's Courtship

Shortly after Ron had joined up with the peacetime airforce, he had brought home a girlfriend whom he was quite infatuated with and his mother Jessie thought that she was absolutely the perfect girl for Ron. His feelings were less than matched by her though, and her father encouraged her to wait until after the war before accepting his marriage proposals.

Again and again, Ron tried to get her to marry him and Jessie was very excited about the prospect of having her as a daughter-in-law. Time and time again, Ron's plans for marriage were turned down until one day he decided to break off the relationship altogether. The fact that he was no longer chasing after her surprised and insulted her. Jessie was also very disappointed and disapproving of Ron's decision.

Ron had received word that he had been transferred to a base in Canada for temporary training and the night that he was preparing to leave, Jessie came to the realization that she would have to accept his decision not to see the girl anymore. She adjusted his crooked tie and said that perhaps he would find miss right in Canada. He did. At least – he met miss Wright.

One night, he and a few other airmen went for dinner at the National Cafe in Moose Jaw, and Daisy Wright was his waitress.

LAC Ron Liversuch had dated Daisy for a major part of the time he was in the Moose Jaw area. It was good for Daisy, but she was looking for something more stable. She was quite infatuated with Ron but he was proving to be very cautious. Even reluctant. He was a British Airman and she was a Canadian girl from small town Moose Jaw. He was far, far away from home and as far as he was concerned he might as well be standing on Mars. This was certainly not his world or home and he knew that he would some day leave this strange and wonderful land.

One of their dating haunts at the time was the #59 Banch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Moose Jaw that catered to the servicemen. Daisy and Ron had already spent many Saturday evenings there and they had enjoyed dancing together very much. He had considered Daisy as his girl, but had not yet even referred to her as his girlfriend.

After a period of time, Daisy with the prompting of a couple of her girlfriends, had decided that enough was enough. To Ron's surprise, Daisy once showed up with a Sergeant from the base. That was the tipping point. Ron finally had to state his intentions. He eventually proposed to her.

When Daisy had accepted Ron's marriage proposal, one of the first things he did was write home to his mother Jessie to make the announcement. Jessie now had to face the reality that Ron would never marry the woman she hoped, but was now engaged to marry Daisy. A girl she had never met. She wrote back to him, signalling her acceptance by asking him if a Canadian Daisy would replant on British soil.

It was now time to go to Daisy's parents James and Daisy Wright for their blessing.

Ron had met them before and had found them to have strong principals and a close sense of family. These were very similar to the way he had been raised by his own parents.

Ron and Daisy dating.

Ron and Daisy dating.

Ron and Daisy's Wedding

It was a particularly cold Christmas Eve in Moose Jaw, Thursday, 24 December 1942. Due to Ron's reassignment back to England, they would have to get married soon. The only date that worked out for Ron, Daisy, the church, the priest and the Air Force, was Christmas Eve. He was set to leave Canada on December 31st.

Ron was polished up and dressed in his Air Force uniform, Daisy wore a blue two-piece skirt suit and a wide brimmed, dark blue hat. They drove to the church during one of Saskatchewan's signature thirty degrees below (Fahrenheit) winter snow storms.

On the way there, the tire of the Daisy's father's Model A automobile went flat the the men had to change it in the driving snow. With some struggle, they finally made it to St John's Anglican Church and were married at 3:30 pm in the basement in a modest ceremony with only a few relatives and friends in attendance.

On the way back to Daisy's parents' house on Stadacona Street East, one of the cars stopped in at a liquor store and purchased a few cases of beer for the reception. It was a loud and cheerful party and Ron, a self-taught piano player picked out the song 'Daisy, Daisy, give me your answer, do' again and again until one of his new in-laws asked him to spare their ears.

Now with his mission to marry Daisy before being transferred back overseas accomplished, he felt more at ease. 31 December came and went without the transfer taking place.

Daisy continued working at the National Cafe and had set them up in an apartment. they lived of the money Ron was paid from the British Air Force and Daisy's earnings from the cafe. Ron would commute to and from the base each day.

James and Daisy Wright, Ron and Daisy Liversuch, Jean Wright and Ron's friend and best man, Trevor, December 24, 1942.

James and Daisy Wright, Ron and Daisy Liversuch,
Jean Wright and Ron's friend and best man, Trevor,
December 24, 1942.

December 1942 issue.

December 1942 issue.

Other Highlights of 1942

The month that Ron and Daisy were married, this local news and entertainment magazine issue was published on the air base.

Ron and his buddies at the base would have read this in December of that year.

Hit Songs of 1942

POINT OF INTEREST:
In the 1942 Vera Lynn song "White Cliffs of Dover"' the term 'Bluebirds flying over' refers to the blue uniforms of the RAF and RCAF pilots. It was written as a tune to lift spirits during the earlier days of the Battle of Britain when it looked as if the Nazis might gain air superiority. It was written by Walter Kent in 1941 and released in 1942.

Hit Movies of 1942

More details about the year 1942.

Ron and Daisy, the proud parents with their first son, Ron Junior. 1943.

A New Family

Ron and Daisy, the proud parents
with their first son, Ron Junior. 1943.

In January 1943, Daisy was told by her doctor that she was pregnant. January, February and March all came and went without the transfer. She would continue working until six months later when their first family cheque arrived from Ottawa.

September came and Daisy delivered their new baby boy, Ron Jr. while Ron paced outside in the waiting room with a couple of other expectant fathers. The following Saturday brought the news to Ron; he was to leave for England on Monday.

He was packed and ready to go on Sunday and went to the hospital to see his new son and his wife. Due to the hospital rules of those days, Ron was not allowed into the room. He could only visit with his new family through the window of the nursery room door. Daisy was tearful as they exchanged loving signals through the glass and Ron had to leave. His posting back to England had come through and he was shipping out that weekend. He would not be able to hold his son or hug his wife goodbye.

The first time he would be able to hold Ron Jr. would be at his parents house in Wales while on a leave. Daisy and Ron Jr. had come over from Canada to be near Ron and they were staying at the home of her new parents-in-law.

Ron and Daisy Liversuch.

Ron and Daisy Liversuch.

After The War

As of 18 January 1946, Ron was a civilian. Daisy, with her son and two daughters had been living with Ron's parents Jessie and Albert. Now Ron had moved in with them also.

Even with all the best intentions in the world, the little Welsh home of Albert and Jessie soon became too small to accommodate Ron and his family as well. Daisy and Jessie often suffered the common problems of two grown women living in the same house, and Ron had to live up to his wedding vows of 'forsaking all others'. It was time to move.

Ron did not want to plant his family in an apartment or rooms. He wanted a house and he managed to find ont pretty quickly. It was a 'Prefab House'. A post-war version of a 'Starter Home'. Temporary accommodations until another homes could become available.

England was still under rationing and Ron and Daisy were struggling to make ends, meet. They knew they had to get on with their lives and make changes. One evening they sat down to discuss their situation. They were sick of the blackouts, the rationing on food, clothing, furniture, bedding, utensils, the quarter pound of sweets allowed for their children per month and other things they were unable to purchase unless they had enough rationing coupons.

Before a full home became available, they had the opportunity to book passage on the transatlantic liner, the Cunard Lines steamship RMS Aquitania.

Ron asked Daisy if she would like to try to make their future life in Canada. She told him that she would, only if he wanted to. She was delighted at the idea of seeing her parents and family again. She was also pleased at the thought of raising her children in her own familiar environment.

At the docks, it was a very emotional time for the family and grandparents. Jessie and Albert stood with Jessie's brother Trevor Lawes and waved as Ron, Daisy and the three kids climbed the gangplank onto the ship. Albert put his arm around Jessie and Trevor gently took her other arm to help her back to the awaiting car while Ron and Daisy were led to their cabin. Very little was said between Ron and Daisy as they settled in for the journey.

They took the kids to the lounge, gave them a glass of soda each and ordered themselves a drink. They had not known that the mighty ship had even left port until they went back up on deck to find themselves sailing past the Isle of Wight.

Ron was now thankful that there were no further threats from German U-Boats and that the journey across the great Atlantic would be a safe one. They were now enroute to Canada and a new life.

Ron and Daisy's first house in Canada.

Ron and Daisy's first house in Canada.

The house where Ron and Daisy remained together until her death in 1989.

The house where Ron and Daisy
remained together until her death in 1989.

Life In Canada

Their first stop in Canada was back to Moose Jaw, where Ron and his new father-in-law used the frame of an old garage to build upon and turn it into a modest house for him, Daisy and their kids. They later sold this residence to a neighbour for the sum of one thousand dollars, which they applied to their next home in Calgary.

Upon moving to Calgary, Ron and Daisy bought a house that had actually been an old neighbourhood store in the southeast part of town. It had nine foot ceilings, one large room that served as the livingroom, kitchen and diningroom. There was one separate bedroom for the three kids and a bathroom.

It was small, old and rickety, but it was home. Ron, with the help of some friends and family, bought some lumber and built three more rooms onto it.

At the time, Ron was working as a sub-foreman at the Lincoln Park Airfield, for the Canadian Pacific Airlines Repairs Ltd. This was a Vancouver based company founded by the Canadian Bush Pilots under George William Grant McConachie with the backing of Wilfred Reid 'Wop' May formerly of the 209 Squadron, Royal Airforce. Mr. May was a World War I veteran pilot who had been in a fierce air battle when his machine guns jammed and refused to fire. He then found that he was being tailed by the infamous Red Baron (Baron Manfred von Richthofen). Just before the Red Baron had a chance to shoot Wop May from the skies, he was himself attacked and shot down by May's commanding officer, Canadian Captain Arthur 'Roy' Brown.

In November of 1953, Ron's parents, Albert and Jessie sent them a letter to announce that they would be in Canada to visit them for Christmas the following year. This made Ron and Daisy, the nervous couple spring into action. They wanted to impress Ron's parents, so they redecorated the house with new furniture, linoleum and new rug.

Albert and Jessie came across on the Cunard Liner 'Franconia' and arrived in Halifax. They took a train to Moose Jaw to meet Daisy's parents Jim and Daisy Sr. for a few days before proceeding to Calgary. They enjoyed each other's company hugely. By this time, construction on Ron and Daisy's second home had begun.

Ron and Daisy did not know at the time, but Albert and Jessie had sold off all their possessions in order to get the money to make the trip to Canada.

A New Canadian Couple.

A New Canadian Couple.

Ron and Daisy late 1940's.

Ron and Daisy late 1940's.

Ron skating with the kids.

Ron skating with the kids.

Ron and Daisy, mid-1950's.

Ron and Daisy, mid-1950's.

Ron and Daisy in front of their Calgary home.

Ron and Daisy in front of their Calgary home.

My favourite picture of Mom and Dad.

My favourite picture of Mom and Dad.

The Later Years

Ron and Daisy continued to live together in Calgary for the rest of their time. Ron worked for many years at the Ogden Shops location of the Canadian Pacific Railway until he finally retired. He then enjoyed a long retirement. Most of his sons and even most of his sons-in-law worked at the same location as well.

Daisy passed away in the hospital on Thursday, 26 January 1989.

Ron passed away peacefully in his sleep in the early morning hours of Thursday, 6 August 1998.

Ron and Daisy 1987.

Ron and Daisy 1987.

Ron and Daisy dancing at their Daughter Julie's wedding.

Ron and Daisy dancing at their Daughter Julie's wedding.

Ron and Daisy in later years.

Ron and Daisy in later years.

Ron and Daisy, mid-1950's.

Ron and Daisy, mid-1950's.

Ron and Daisy in their back yard in Calgary.

Ron and Daisy in their back yard in Calgary.

Ron and Daisy's Wedding Anniversary on Christmas Eve.

Ron and Daisy's Wedding Anniversary on Christmas Eve.

“As long as war is regarded as wicked, it will always have its fascination. When it is looked upon as vulgar, it will cease to be popular.”
― Oscar Wilde, The Critic as Artist
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